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Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

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Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


November 26

Trần Nhân Tông

Trần Nhân Tông (1258–1308) was the third monarch of the Trần dynasty, reigning over Đại Việt from 1278. During the second and third Mongol invasions of Đại Việt between 1284 and 1288, Nhân Tông and his father the retired emperor Trần Thánh Tông achieved a decisive victory against the Yuan dynasty. Nhân Tông ruled until his abdication in 1293, when he passed the throne on to his son Trần Anh Tông. This is a handscroll depicting Nhân Tông, which is now in the collection of the Liaoning Provincial Museum in Shenyang, China.

Painting credit: unknown; photographed by Chloë Trần Phương Anh


November 25

Julie d'Aubigny

Julie d'Aubigny (1670/1673 – 1707), better known as Mademoiselle Maupin or La Maupin, was a 17th-century French opera singer. Little is known for certain about her life; her tumultuous career and flamboyant lifestyle were the subject of gossip, rumor, and colourful stories in her own time, and inspired numerous fictional and semi-fictional portrayals afterwards. Théophile Gautier loosely based the title character, Madeleine de Maupin, of his novel Mademoiselle de Maupin (1835) on her.

Illustration credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 24

Turkey

The turkey is a large species of bird in the genus Meleagris, native to North America. There are two extant turkey species: the wild turkey (M. gallopavo) of eastern and central North America and the ocellated turkey (M. ocellata) of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. Males of both turkey species have a distinctive fleshy wattle, called a snood, that hangs from the top of the beak. They are among the largest birds in their ranges. As with many large ground-feeding birds (members of the order Galliformes), the male is bigger and much more colorful than the female. This photograph, taken at Deer Island Preserve in Novato, California, shows a male Rio Grande wild turkey (M. g. intermedia) strutting – the courtship display, in which the snood (the erectile, fleshy protuberance on the forehead) engorges with blood, becomes redder and elongates, hanging well below the beak.

Photograph credit: Frank Schulenburg


November 23

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Cephalanthus occidentalis is a species of flowering plant in the family Rubiaceae native to eastern and southern North America. Common names include buttonbush, common buttonbush, button-willow, buck brush, and honey-bells. It is a deciduous shrub or small tree that averages 1 to 3 m (3.3 to 9.8 ft) in height, but can reach 6 m (20 ft). The flowers are arranged in a dense spherical inflorescence 2 to 3.5 cm (0.79 to 1.38 in) in diameter on a short peduncle. Each flower has a fused white to pale yellow four-lobed corolla forming a long slender tube connecting to the sepals. The stigma protrudes slightly from the corolla. The fruit is a spherical cluster of achenes (nutlets). This C. occidentalis plant, of the occidentalis variety, was photographed flowering in Point Pelee National Park in Ontario, Canada.

Photograph credit: The Cosmonaut


November 22

Saint Anne

Saint Anne is a Makurian wall painting estimated to have been painted between the 8th and 9th centuries, painted a secco with tempera on plaster. The anonymous work, depicting Saint Anne, the mother of Mary, was found at Faras Cathedral in Lower Nubia, located in the north of present-day Sudan. The painting was discovered by a Polish archaeological team during a campaign undertaken in the 1960s under the patronage of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in Faras, before the site was flooded by the creation of Lake Nasser. Since 1964, the painting has been in the Faras Gallery at the National Museum in Warsaw.

Painting credit: unknown


November 21

Laetiporus sulphureus

Laetiporus sulphureus is a species of bracket fungus (fungi that grow on trees) found in Europe and North America. Due to its taste, Laetiporus sulphureus has been called the "chicken polypore" and "chicken-of-the-woods" Many people also think that the mushroom tastes like crab or lobster leading to the nickname "lobster-of-the-woods". The authors of Mushrooms in Color said that the mushroom tastes good sauteed in butter or prepared in a cream sauce served on toast or rice.

Photograph credit: Agnes Monkelbaan

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November 20

Close-up of a newborn baby girl yawning while lying down

A yawn is a reflex consisting of the simultaneous inhalation of air and the stretching of the eardrums, followed by an exhalation of breath. Many animal species, including birds and fish, experience yawning. The study of yawning is called chasmology. Yawning (oscitation) most often occurs in adults immediately before and after sleep, during tedious activities and as a result of its contagious quality. This photograph shows a newborn girl yawning; research data strongly suggest that neither contagious nor story-induced yawning is reliable in children below the age of six years.

Photograph credit: Martin Falbisoner


November 19

Eurasian coot

The Eurasian coot (Fulica atra), also known as the common coot, or Australian coot, is a species of bird in the family Rallidae. It is found in Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand and parts of North Africa. The Eurasian coot is much less secretive than most of the rail family and can be seen swimming on open water or walking across waterside grasslands. It is an aggressive species, and strongly territorial during the breeding season, with both parents involved in territorial defence. This juvenile Eurasian coot was photographed in Marais Audomarois, a biosphere reserve in Saint-Omer-Capelle, France.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp

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November 18

Caves of Hercules

The Caves of Hercules is an archaeological cave complex located in Cape Spartel, Morocco. Situated 14 kilometres (9 mi) west of Tangier, the popular tourist attraction is adjacent to the summer palace of the king of Morocco. The cave itself is partly natural and partly man-made. The man-made portion was used by Berbers to cut stone wheels from the walls to make millstones, resulting in the ridges visible on the walls in this photograph of the cave's interior.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso

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November 17

Nina Simone

Nina Simone (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003) was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. Her music spanned styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel and pop.

The sixth of eight children born to a poor family in Tryon, North Carolina, Simone initially aspired to be a concert pianist. However, after being denied admission to the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia despite a well-received audition (which she attributed to racism), she started playing piano at a nightclub in Atlantic City. She changed her name to "Nina Simone" to disguise herself from family members, having chosen to play "the devil's music" or so-called "cocktail piano". She was told in the nightclub that she would have to sing to her own accompaniment, which effectively launched her career as a jazz vocalist. She went on to record more than 40 albums between 1958 and 1974.

Photograph credit: Ron Kroon for Anefo; restored by Bammesk

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November 16

Ariane

Ariane is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French-language libretto by Catulle Mendès. Based on the tale of Ariadne in Greek mythology, it was first performed at the Palais Garnier in Paris on 31 October 1906, with Lucienne Bréval in the title role. One critic noted Ariane to be one of the most "Wagnerian" of Massenet's operas. This poster was designed in 1906 by the French painter Albert Maignan to advertise the opera's premiere.

Poster credit: Albert Maignan; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 15

Wilhering Abbey

Wilhering Abbey is a Cistercian monastery in Wilhering in Upper Austria, about 8 km (5 mi) from the city of Linz. The buildings, re-constructed in the 18th century, are known for their spectacular Rococo decoration. According to the German art historian Cornelius Gurlitt, "the abbey church of Wilhering is the most brilliant achievement of the Rococo style in the German-speaking world". This photograph depicts the interior of the church, looking towards the high altar, featuring the intricate ceiling frescoes and stucco work.

Photograph credit: Uoaei1


November 14

La Esmeralda

La Esmeralda is a grand opera in four acts composed by Louise Bertin, with a French-language libretto written by Victor Hugo, who adapted it from his 1831 novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. The opera premiered at the Théâtre de l'Académie Royale de Musique in Paris on 14 November 1836, with Cornélie Falcon in the title role. There was some disruption at the premiere, as members of the audience who disliked the Bertin family shouted out that the work had been written by Berlioz, an accusation which Berlioz himself denied. La Esmeralda proved to be the last opera composed by Bertin although she lived for another 40 years. This drawing is Charles-Antoine Cambon's set design for act 3, scene 1, of La Esmeralda, in which Phoebus meets with Esmeralda, and Frollo spies on them and eventually stabs Phoebus with his sword.

Illustration credit: Charles-Antoine Cambon; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 13

Xylotrupes socrates

Xylotrupes socrates, the Siamese rhinoceros beetle or fighting beetle, is a species of large scarab beetle belonging to the subfamily Dynastinae. It is particularly known for its role in insect fighting in Thailand, where they are captured and trained by their owners to become stronger and more aggressive, with the beetle that lifts its opponent up by its horns winning. An insect may also win if its opponent crawls away, falls or is overturned. This photograph of a male X. socrates beetle on a banana leaf was focus-stacked from 23 images.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


November 12

Mizrah-shiviti

An example of a mizrah papercut art which serves a dual purpose: as a mizrah (decoration for the eastern wall, marking the direction of prayer), and as a shiviti, an edifying text which reminded the worshipper of the importance of prayer.

Credit: Israel Dov Rosenbaum/Jewish Museum


November 11

Recruitment to the British Army during World War I

Recruitment to the British Army during World War I was carried out initially by seeking volunteers: 100,000 were called up in early August, and within two months, almost half a million men had enlisted. This 1914 recruitment poster by the Parliamentary Recruitment Committee shows a Scottish soldier in Belgium, in response to German chancellor Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg having described the Treaty of London (which protected Belgium's independence and neutrality) as a "scrap of paper" when Germany invaded Belgium in August 1914.

Poster credit: Lawson Wood; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 10

Franchise Tax Board of California v. Hyatt

Seth P. Waxman presents oral arguments before the US Supreme Court in the case Franchise Tax Board of California v. Hyatt, a 2019 United States Supreme Court case that determined that unless they consent, states have sovereign immunity from private suits filed against them in the courts of another state. The 5–4 decision overturned precedent set in a 1979 Supreme Court case, Nevada v. Hall. This was the third time that the litigants had presented their case to the Court, as the Court had already ruled on the issue in 2003 and 2016.

Illustration credit: Arthur Lien


November 9

Apollo 4

Apollo 4, also known as SA-501, was the first, uncrewed, flight in the United States Apollo program, and the first test of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the rocket that would be used to send astronauts to the Moon. The space vehicle was the first to be launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, lifting off from Launch Complex 39A, where facilities designed specially for the Saturn V had been constructed, on November 9, 1967 – depicted in this photograph. The original launch date was planned for late 1966, but was delayed due to myriad problems with various elements of the spacecraft, and difficulties during pre-flight testing. Also contributing to the delays was the need for additional inspections following the Apollo 1 fire that killed the first Apollo crew in January 1967. These issues delayed the flight through much of 1967. The mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean slightly less than nine hours after launch, having achieved its objectives.

Photograph credit: NASA


November 8

Isaiah Scroll

The Isaiah Scroll, designated 1QIsaa and also known as the Great Isaiah Scroll, is one of the seven Dead Sea Scrolls that were discovered by Bedouin shepherds in 1946 from Qumran Cave 1. The scroll is written in Hebrew and contains the entire Book of Isaiah from beginning to end, apart from a few small damaged portions. It is the oldest complete copy of the Book of Isaiah, being approximately 1000 years older than the oldest Hebrew manuscripts known before the scrolls' discovery. 1QIsaa is the only scroll from the Qumran Caves to be preserved almost in its entirety.

Photograph credit: Google Art Project/Israel Museum


November 7

Jeannette Rankin

Jeannette Rankin (1880–1973) was an American politician and advocate for women's rights, and the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the House of Representatives as a Republican from Montana in 1916 and again in 1940, and remains the only woman ever elected to Congress from the state. This photograph of Rankin was taken in 1917, shortly before she began her term as a member of Congress.

Photograph credit: Bain News Service; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 6

Les Huguenots

Les Huguenots is an opera by the German composer Giacomo Meyerbeer, based on the French Wars of Religion and with a French-language libretto by Eugène Scribe and Émile Deschamps. One of the most popular and spectacular examples of grand opera, it premiered in Paris on 29 February 1836. The plot moves from day to night as the massacre of the Huguenots approaches. Act 1 is set in the daytime, in the hedonistic surroundings of a chateau belonging to a pleasure-loving Catholic noble. Act 2 is set in sparkling sunshine in the beautiful countryside. Act 3, with near riots between Catholic and Protestant factions, happens as dusk falls. Act 4, with the plotting to massacre the Protestants, occurs at night, and Act 5, with the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre itself, occurs in the darkness of the early hours of the morning. This lithograph depicts the set design for Act 2 of the opera's premiere performance, depicting the gardens of the Château de Chenonceau in west central France.

Lithograph credit: Célestin Deshayes; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 5

Strategic bombing during World War II

Photograph of U.S. Consolidated B-24 Liberators just after bombing the Concordia Vega oil refinery in Ploiești, Romania on 31 May 1944 during World War II.

Strategic bombing during World War II involved sustained aerial attacks on railways, harbours, cities, workers' and civilian housing, and industrial districts in enemy territory during World War II (1939–1945). Strategic bombing as a military strategy is distinct both from close air support of ground forces and from tactical air power. During World War II, many military strategists of air power believed that air forces could win major victories by attacking industrial and political infrastructure, rather than purely military targets. Strategic bombing often involved bombing areas inhabited by civilians, and some campaigns were deliberately designed to target civilian populations in order to terrorize them and disrupt their usual activities. International law at the outset of World War II did not specifically forbid the aerial bombardment of cities – despite the prior occurrence of such bombing during World War I (1914–1918), the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939), and the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945).

Photograph credit: Richard R. Ganczak ; restored by Buidhe


November 4

Henry Février's Gismonda

Gismonda is a 1919 French-language grand opera by Henry Février to a libretto by Henri Caïn and Louis Payen based on the 1894 play Gismonda by Victorien Sardou. The planned premiere in Paris was halted by the outbreak of World War I, but the composer was given leave from the French army to premiere the opera with Mary Garden in the title role at the Chicago Opera on 14 January 1919. Gismonda opened in Paris at the Opéra-Comique on 15 October, for which occasion this poster was designed by Georges Rochegrosse.

Poster credit: Georges Rochegrosse; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 3

Skyline of the Pudong district of Shanghai, seen from the water at dusk.

Shanghai is one of the four direct-administered municipalities of the People's Republic of China. The city is located on the southern estuary of the Yangtze River, with the Huangpu River flowing through it. With a population of 24.89 million as of 2021, Shanghai is the most populous urban area in China and among the most populous cities proper in the world. It is the only city in East Asia with a GDP greater than its corresponding capital. As of 2018, the Greater Shanghai metropolitan area, which includes Suzhou, Wuxi, Nantong, Ningbo, Jiaxing, Zhoushan, and Huzhou, was estimated to produce a gross metropolitan product (nominal) of nearly 9.1 trillion RMB ($1.33 trillion). Shanghai is divided into 16 county-level districts, including the Pudong district pictured here.

Photograph credit: Tony Jin


November 2

Sphaerechinus granularis

Sphaerechinus granularis is a species of sea urchin in the family Toxopneustidae, commonly known as the violet sea urchin. Its range includes the Mediterranean Sea and the eastern Atlantic Ocean, from the Channel Islands south to Cape Verde and the Gulf of Guinea. It favours sheltered locations and lives on rocks covered with seaweed or gravelly substrates. It is usually found in the neritic zone down to about thirty metres (100 ft) but occasionally down to a hundred metres (330 ft) in more exposed locations. It is also found in meadows of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica. It grazes on algae, especially encrusting coralline algae, seagrass blades and their epiphytic organisms and detritus. This S. granularis sea urchin was photographed off the coast of Madeira.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


November 1

View of water passing over jagged rocks into the rapids below.

The Khone Phapheng Falls and Pha Pheng Falls together form a waterfall located in Champasak province on the Mekong River in southern Laos, near the border with Cambodia. At 10,783 metres (6.7 miles) in width, it is the widest waterfall in the world.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


October 31

Tomb of Giovanni Battista Gisleni

Tomb of the architect Giovanni Battista Gisleni (1600–1672) in the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome. The figure of a skeleton was sculpted by the architect. The carved text reads Neque hic vivus (not visible in this image) and Neque illic mortuus (Latin: "Neither living here — nor dead there"). Text in the two tondi (circles) reads In nidulo meo moriar ("In my nest I die" i.e. in Rome) and Ut phoenix multiplicabo dies ("As a phoenix I multiply my days").

credit: Joaquim Alves Gaspar


October 30

Trimeresurus albolabris

Trimeresurus albolabris, the white-lipped pit viper or white-lipped tree viper, is a venomous pit viper species endemic to Southeast Asia. Its meals consist of birds, small frogs, and small mammals. This snake does not strike and release its prey; like many arboreal snakes, it strikes and holds on to the prey item until the prey dies.

This photograph was taken in Thailand's Kaeng Krachan National Park.

Photograph credit: Rushen


October 29

Plexippus petersi

Plexippus petersi is a species of jumping spider native to Asia and has been introduced to Africa and the Pacific Islands. The male is between 6 and 10 millimetres (0.24 and 0.39 in) in length, and the female around 10 millimetres (0.39 in). Plexippus petersi is a house spider, living indoors, and is noted for the skilful way it hunts and catches mosquitoes, flies and other invertebrates. It has also been found living in crops in the Philippines, in one instance in a rice field infested with the armyworm Spodoptera mauritia, and in another, in a corn field attacked by the northern armyworm Mythimna separata. This focus-stacked photograph depicts a P. petersi spider, approximately 7 millimetres (0.28 in) in length, on a human finger.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


October 28

United States Notes are a type of paper money that was issued from 1862 to 1971 in the United States, longer than any other form of U.S. paper money. They were known popularly as "greenbacks", a name inherited from the earlier greenbacks that they replaced in 1862. Often termed Legal Tender Notes, they were named United States Notes by the First Legal Tender Act, which authorized them as a form of fiat money. During the early 1860s the so-called second obligation on the reverse of the notes stated: "This Note is a Legal Tender for all debts public and private except Duties on Imports and Interest on the Public Debt; and is receivable in payment of all loans made to the United States." These nine United States Notes, in denominations from $1 to $1000, were issued in 1880. Each bears the signatures of the register of the Treasury and the treasurer of the United States, and a portrait of a different individual, identified above. The banknotes are part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; scanned by Andrew Shiva


Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December